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Teaching the Holocaust through Visual Culture: NEH Summer Seminar for School Teachers at Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME  July 11–23, 2022

This NEH Summer Seminar for School Teachers (for middle school and high school teachers) is sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and is offered by Bowdoin College.

Peter Eisenman, Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, 2005, Berlin, Germany

Peter Eisenman, Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, 2005, Berlin, Germany

Objects of visual culture such as works of art (including paintings, drawings, sculpture, and photography), as well as ephemeral objects, such as posters, cartoons, and uniforms, have historically been seen, in middle and high school classes, as peripheral to the study of the Holocaust. We aim to place these objects at the center of the study of the Holocaust, thereby enriching language arts and social studies curricula. Participants will learn and share ideas about how to teach the Holocaust by training students to use visual analysis and critical thinking skills.

Faculty and Visiting Lecturers

Leading experts and award-winning scholars will lead these comprehensive workshops. In conjunction with inquiry-based activities centered in the classroom, invited scholars will also take part in lecture/discussions. Our study will be complemented by visits to Bowdoin’s Special Collections, the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, and the Holocaust and Human Rights Center in Augusta, ME.

Seminar Dates: July 11–23, 2022

Applications Due: March 1, 2022

Participants Notified: March 25, 2022

Deadline to Accept: April 8, 2022

Depending on public-health guidelines related to COVID-19, plans for a residential offering are subject to change.

Charlotte Salomon, Life or Theatre: A Play Without Music, 1940-42, 769 works painted while in hiding. Each 12” x 9”.

Charlotte Salomon, Life or Theatre: A Play Without Music, 1940-42, 769 works painted while in hiding. Each 12” x 9”.

 

Disclaimer of Endorsement:

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.